ISGSD - EXECUTIVE BOARD

Prof. Dr. Gunnar Jacks
(KTH Royal Institute of Technology,
Stockholm, Sweden)
President

Prof. Dr. Jochen Bundschuh
(University of Southern Queensland,
Toowoomba, Australia)
Vice President

Dr. Prosun Bhattacharya (KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm,
Sweden & University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba, Australia)
Executive Secretary and Treasurer

Arslan Ahmad (KWR Watercycle Research Institute,
Nieuwegein, The Netherlands)
International Relations Coordinator

Prof. Dr. Gunnar Jacks
(KTH Royal Institute of Technology,
Stockholm, Sweden)
President

Gunnar Jacks completed his M Sc as mining engineer at KTH Royal Institute of Technology Stockholm in 1963. During the period 1965-1967 he was engaged in humanitarian work in Turkey and then returned back to KTH and defended his PhD at Royal Inst. of Technology in 1973 on a thesis entitled: “Chemistry of Groundwater in Hard Rocks”. During the period, 1976-1978 he worked for Central Ground Water Board of India 1976-1984 (full time). He became an Associate Professor at KTH in 1978 and later in 1986 he was appointed as a full Professor of Groundwater Chemistry. Currently Gunnar Jacks is professor emeritus of groundwater chemistry at the Department of Sustainable Development, Environmental Science and Engineering at KTH. Since 1996 Jacks has had ties to Åbo Akademi University, Finland and in 2002-2006 he acted guest professor at the Institute of Geology and Mineralogy. With his versatile knowledge he has been a great resource for the research and education within environmental geology and chemistry. While groundwater chemistry has been his major field of expertise, he has worked on a number major issues in the fields such as, acidification of soil and water; environmental effects of mining, geogenic contaminants in groundwater such as fluoride and arsenic, groundwater recharge in semi-arid areas and also on agricultural ecosystems such as arsenic in rice and zinc deficiency in soils, crops and human food intake. He has published more than 190 scientific papers and peer-reviewed conferences papers and book chapters and has more than 3310 citations (h-index 30).
Based on his profound knowledge in the fields of hydrogeology, soil sciences and global water supply and experience in a several water supply projects in developing countries, he had been uninously elected as the President of the International Society of Ground water for Sustainable Development in 2006. Gunnar Jacks is conferred with Honorary Doctor of Philosophy by the Åbo Akademi University in 2016 in recognition of his contributions to research and education.

Prof. Dr. Jochen Bundschuh
(University of Southern Queensland,
Toowoomba, Australia)
Vice President

Jochen Bundschuh has been working for over 20 years on inorganic trace contaminants in water resources, mostly in groundwater and respective sustainable mitigation. He completed PhD on numerical modeling of heat transport in aquifers from University of Tübingen, Germany in 1990. From 1993 to 1999 he served as an expert for the German Agency of Technical Cooperation (GTZ, now GIZ) and as a long-term professor for the DAAD (German Academic Exchange Service) in Argentine. From 2001 to 2008 he worked within the framework of the German governmental cooperation (Integrated Expert Program of CIM; GTZ/BA) as adviser in mission to Costa Rica at the Instituto Costarricense de Electricidad (ICE), where he assisted the country in evaluation and development of huge low-enthalpy geothermal resources for power generation. Since 2005, he is an affiliate professor of the Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden. In 2006, he was elected Vice-President of the International Society of Groundwater for Sustainable Development ISGSD. From 2009–2011 he was visiting professor at the Department of Earth Sciences at the National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan. Since 2012, Dr. Bundschuh is a full professor in hydrogeology at the University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba, Australia where he leads the Platform for Water in the Nexus of Sustainable Development working in the wide field of water resources and low/middle enthalpy geothermal resources, water and wastewater treatment and sustainable and renewable energy resources. In November 2012, Prof. Bundschuh was appointed as leader of the newly established Australian Chapter of the International Medical Geology Association (IMGA).

Dr. Bundschuh has authored several books such as “Low-Enthalpy Geothermal Resources for Power Generation” (2008) (CRC Press/Balkema) and “Introduction to the Numerical Modeling of Groundwater and Geothermal Systems: Fundamentals of Mass, Energy and Solute Transport in Poroclastic Rocks”. He has edited 18 books and editor of the book series “Multiphysics Modeling”, “Arsenic in the Environment”, “Sustainable Energy Developments” and “Sustainable Water Developments” (all CRC Press/Balkema). Since 2015, he is an editor in chief of the Elsevier journal “Groundwater for Sustainable Development”. Dr. Bundschuh is one of the International organizer of the Congress series “Arsenic in the Environment” which provides an inter- and multidisciplinary state-of-art international platform for arsenic research, and making an effort to link the occurrence of geogenic arsenic in different environments and media including ground- and surface water, soil, biota and air, and its effect on society.

Dr. Prosun Bhattacharya (KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm,
Sweden & University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba, Australia)
Executive Secretary and Treasurer

Prosun Bhattacharya holds a PhD in Sedimentary Geochemistry from University of Delhi, India (1990). He is a Professor of Groundwater Chemistry and Coordinator of the KTH-International Groundwater Arsenic Research Group, at the Department of Sustainable Development, Environmental Science and Engineering at KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden. Since 2016, he is also an Adjunct Professor at the School of Civil Engineering & Surveying & International Centre for Applied Climate Science at the University of Southern Queensland, Australia. He is engaged with research on groundwater contamination in sedimentary aquifers in different parts of the world, especially focusing on geogenic contaminants – arsenic and fluoride. He has collaborative research engagements with universities and research organizations in India, Bangladesh, China, Australia, Argentina, Ghana, Costa Rica, Bolivia, Tanzania, Turkey, Jordan and USA. He has coordinated the prestigious Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency supported action research and implementation project “Sustainable Arsenic Mitigation-SASMIT” Community driven initiatives to target arsenic safe groundwater as sustainable mitigation strategy in Bangladesh* (2007-2016). He has authored/co-authored over 300 international publications in peer-reviewed journals and conference proceedings, cited more than 8200 times (Google Scholar and Google h-index 44) and i10-index of over 110. He has organized several international workshops on natural arsenic in groundwater and sustainable mitigation and edited 9 books on diverse aspects of natural arsenic in groundwater and groundwater for sustainable development until 2014. He is the Editor in Chief of Journal Groundwater for Sustainable Development published by Elsevier and the Frontiers in Environmental Sciences: Specialty Section on Groundwater Resources and Management and Associate Editor of Journal of Hydrology and a member of the Editorial Board of Environment International. Based on his global engagements in the field of arsenic research he has been honored with the title as the Fellow of the Geological Society of America in April, 2012. Since 2017, he is elected as the Chair of the IWA Specialist Group Metals and Related Substances in Drinking Water (METRELS).

Arslan Ahmad (KWR Watercycle Research Institute,
Nieuwegein, The Netherlands)
International Relations Coordinator

Arslan Ahmad is a leading Research Scientist at KWR Watecycle Research Institute of the Netherlands, with particular focus on the removal of metals and related substances from drinking water. Part of his work is also focused on resource recovery from water, wastewater and residuals generated from the treatment processes. More recently, Arslan Ahmad has been engaged in the development of innovative solutions for managing low arsenic and chromate concentrations in public drinking water supply in the Netherlands. Arslan Ahmad is the Exhibition Chair and Member of the Scientific Committee of 7th International Congress on Arsenic in the Environment (As2018). Arslan Ahmad is Guest Editor of CRC Press/Taylor & Francis Book Series “Sustainable Water Developments”. He is closely collaborating with KTH-International Groundwater Arsenic Research Group at the KTH Royal Institute of Technology and the International Society of Groundwater for Sustainable Development (ISGSD) on developing cutting edge technology or arsenic removal. Since 2017, he is elected as the Vice -Chair of the IWA Specialist Group Metals and Related Substances in Drinking Water (METRELS).

The various activities will focus on:

  • Improving capacity of the sector professionals including GO and NGOs and academic institutions.
  • Sharing state-of-the-art knowledge (new publications, congresses, fieldwork results) in the area of common interest.
  • Discussing problems and questions posed by fellow members, the politicians, international aid and technical cooperation agencies, general public or
  • potential clients and members.
  • Create a platform for regular international congresses (proposed biannually) with the name of International Congress Groundwater for Sustainable Development (ICGSD) as well as regional conferences organized locally by the regional or individual country chapters of the ISGSD.
  • Another component in the spectrum of ISGSD activities is to prepare strategies for joint research and advisory activities of the Communities of Experts.

WHY ISGSD?

Water is an integral part of the environment and its availability is indispensable to the efficient functioning of the biosphere. Water is also of vital importance to all socio-economic sectors? human and economic development simply is not possible without a safe, stable water supply. On the other hand, water has also a destructive potential. Extreme events may have an impact not only on human society but also on the aquatic and terrestrial environments. Water resources must be seen in the overall context of development.

The water resources especially in the developing countries are subject to increasing stress both in terms of quantity as well as quality. In recent decades many surface waters have become highly contaminated with domestic and industrial wastes as well as urban and agricultural runoff. Exponential population growth has led to many urban populations now nearing or exceeding a million. Most rural areas depend solely on groundwater, for urban areas groundwater becomes increasingly important. The high dependence on groundwater will increase even further in the next decade due to severe limitations on the availability of reliable quantities of surface water and its continuous degradation.

Groundwater is often the primary source for domestic and industrial water supply. Groundwater also supports the major demand from agriculture by providing large quantities of irrigation water, especially in zones with rather dry climate where crop production without irrigation is not possible. Groundwater plays a key role in keeping wet ecosystems sustainable and maintaining a suitable environment for human settlement. To gain full benefit from groundwater, substantial efforts are needed to investigate the groundwater systems and to organize their rational exploitation. However, attention is not only required for its exploitation, but also for controlling a wide range of problems related to groundwater. World-wide it is observed that contamination or salinization threatens the groundwater’s suitability for drinking or for other intended uses; that groundwater is becoming excessively expensive or scarce if the stored volumes are depleted or exhausted; that land subsidence occurs as a consequence of groundwater withdrawal; and that landscapes may turn dry and desolate by the decline of shallow water tables. Most of these problems tend to develop rather slowly, but controlling them is difficult and many of them are practically irreversible.

Groundwater is in most parts of the world an extremely important natural resource, more important than most people realize. Especially significant predominantly for the developing countries is the need to manage effectively their own water resources while modernizing and integrating their economies. Such water resources management requires considerable technical expertise in hydrogeology and water resources management, which do not exist in a significant extent in most of these countries.

In the United Nations Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), the environment has been considered as one of the key points of the development agenda. It has also been acclaimed by most of the environment specialists, that groundwater is an important element of the environment that influences the changing ecological conditions of the globe.

Therefore, it is important to anticipate and recognize such problems in due time and to implement appropriate measures to control or mitigate them without delay. Many groundwater professionals believe that sharing knowledge and experience on groundwater matters on a worldwide scale is an effective strategy to identify and promote optimal approaches to the assessment, development and management of groundwater resources. This is what the International Society of Groundwater Resources for Sustainable Development (ISGSD) intends to facilitate.

On this global platform, the members of the ISGSD should enjoy all the benefits of global collaborative working, facilitated by the Information Technology carried out under the Society. The idea on the formulation of this International Society was crystallized as a wrap up of the newly concluded second International Groundwater Conference on Groundwater and Sustainable Development: Problems, Perspectives, and Challenges held in New Delhi, India between February 1–4, 2006.